Apps

Jesse's Apps Book

The apps book is out! Copies are now shipping to bookstores. Or you can order from Amazon.

It's a concise book about these new technologies designed for people who want to get involved. You'll find out how apps work and how you can become a developer -- whether you want to be a hands-on developer or a designer or someone who uses apps in your business plan.

The first half of the book introduces you to the technologies in pretty basic terms. (I've written other, more technical books on the topic.) Then, in the second half you'll find eight specific strategies for ways in which you can use apps. We've seen this new world explode with activity. Apps are now part of standard business plans, but they're also part of strategies for non-profits and political candidates of all stripes. 

What apps have going for them are their numbers. They can be incredibly cheap to produce and distribute, but with the right design and promotion, they can reach large numbers of people. I also talk about the small/small paradigm: a low-cost app reaching a small number of people and still being profitable and productive.

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Apps Articles on the Site

Whatever Happened to FORTRAN? (and COBOL)

On WAMC's Roundtable for Wednesday July 9, 2014 (11:30 AM), Jesse and Joe will discuss three new programming languages from Apple, Google, and Facebook. Not a technical discussion, the topic is how and why these three major vendors decided to go into the computer language building business.

Jesse on "The App Guy" Podcast

Jesse talks with Paul Kemp (founder of OneMob) on his podcast. The conversation covers tech and business issues and includes a few amusing anecdotes about this mobile world we're living in. It's free on iTunes.

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Jesse's Objective-C Video

74 videos totalling 5.25 hours of training in the language and tools you'll need to program iOS and OS X. Find out more here.

Objective-C has been changing recently. There were major changes in Objective-C 2.0, but that was released in 2007, and six years can be an eternity in the software world. Since 2007, new features have been added including Automatic Reference Counting (ARC), blocks, literals, and subscripts. With the latest releases of Xcode, new tools are available in Edit/Refactor to convert your legacy code to use ARC and modern syntax. This is a change from previous guidance which suggested that adopting ARC on existing projects wasn't recommended. Now it's not only recommended but automated.

Blocks are perhaps one of the most critical changes. They are not unique to Objective-C (they're often called closures in computer science courses). They consist of functions or function references together with a referencing environment consisting of the non-local variables that are needed by the block. Blocks are sweeping through the Cocoa and Cocoa Touch frameworks often replacing callback functions. As more and more of our apps are multi-threaded and asynchronous, blocks provide an excellent non-linear way of developing code.

Put together, these recent changes mean that if you've been putting off learning Objective-C, now is the right time to jump in, and this video can help. If you learned Objective-C in the past, now is the time for a refresher to bring your knowledge up to date.

Sams Teach Yourself Objective-C in 24 Hours

In just 24 sessions of one hour or less, you can master the Objective-C language, and start using it to write powerful native applications for both Macs and iOS devices! Using this book’s straightforward, step-by-step approach, you’ll get comfortable with Objective-C’s unique capabilities… make the most of its powerful implementation of objects and messaging…work effectively with design patterns, collections, blocks, threading, and a whole lot more. Every lesson builds on what you’ve already learned, giving you a rock-solid foundation for real-world success!

 

Order now from Amazon.

 

Printed in full color—figures and code appear as they do in Xcode

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iOS 6 Foundations

I've written about many aspects of iOS development, but until now I've never written a getting-started book. In a way, that's an advantage, because in the last few releases, iOS and Xcode have changed dramatically. Much of the code that we had to write a year or two ago is no longer necessary. Some of it is provided by the frameworks themselves, but some of it is automatically generated by Xcode which now implements new features of Objective-C.

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